Twist on PR

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6 Tips for Managing a Celebrity Spokesperson

Rebecca PotznerComment
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Celebrities have a lot of influence on society. Possibly more than ever with the rise of social media. So, it's not surprising that we want to turn to them for help in our markeitng and PR efforts. However, it's a lot more than just signing a contract with your favorite celebrity and showing them off. Goals need to be set, a plan needs to be put in place and research needs to be done to find your perfect celebrity fit. As you move forward with your celebrity spokesperson, there are some tips you'll want to keep in mind...

-If they don't want to talk about it, it won't come off authentic

Choose your celebrity wisely. You want to spend your time and money wisely, so decide on a celebrity that uses your product or connects with your mission, not just because they're "all the rage." Someone who is familiar and passionate with what they're representing is going to be able to execute in a more authentic way than someone who is disconnected. Keep in mind that your audience can and most likely WILL detect counterfeit testimonials. If they don't want to talk about it, you're missing out on their willingness to share throughout word of mouth and their social outlets.

 Bobbie Brown Cosmetics really hit a grand slam with this one. Not only is Kate Upton extremely popular and well-liked, but we all know she loves and most importantly uses makeup. Their Instagram chat was authentic and connected well with the brand.

Bobbie Brown Cosmetics really hit a grand slam with this one. Not only is Kate Upton extremely popular and well-liked, but we all know she loves and most importantly uses makeup. Their Instagram chat was authentic and connected well with the brand.

-Do what they're comfortable with. They may need guidance.

Just because they're confident on screen, doesn't mean they're confident about representing your brand or product or being in a certain situation. Don't push them to do something they aren't comfortable with as they're representation may come off as generic. Before the relationship is set, be sure to ask them if they're comfortable with doing what your team has planned. Once they've accepted the position, put in a little extra effort and offer them a few tips and even a one sheet with information. This will be quick and easy for them to look over. 

-Tie your idea back to the business objective

You have a celebrity spokesperson. Great, but why? Don't just set up this arrangement because of their celebrity status. There needs to be reasoning behind why you specifically chose them and what you want to accomplish. Did you bring them in to raise awareness? Maybe you wanted to see more social media engagement or more sales. Whatever the reason, make sure the celebrity is there to help you reach that goal. 

-People are hungry for what happens behind the curtain

That's why TMZ and all of the papz are still employed, isn't it? Showing your target audience behind the scene photos or videos can really help the authenticity of both the company and the celebrity. With celebrities, staged and scripted pieces can come off as corny and unbelievable. Bloopers, organic conversation, and normal setting photos can give your campaign the human connection that it needs to resonate with your audience

 The Esurance commercial with the Bryan Brothers wasn't a behind the scenes, but you get the picture. 

The Esurance commercial with the Bryan Brothers wasn't a behind the scenes, but you get the picture. 

-Establish your expectations before they walk into the relationship.

Before signing the dotted line, establish yours and the clients expectations of being a spokesperson. Go through every detail of your plan making sure nothing is skipped over or hidden. You want your celebrity spokesperson fully on board. 

-Make them feel like a part of the project/ Keep it organic

The more involved they are in the process, the more they'll be able to talk about your brand/company more freely. Besides that, they may even be able to contribute some ideas. After all, they know themselves better than you do. Without talking with Kendall Jenner, would they have known about the video of her as a child putting on her mothers makeup? Probably not. Now, they have this great piece to introduce their new model.


If you've had any experience with bringing in a celebrity spokesperson, what tips would you add?